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Does CBD show up on a drug test?

As CBD attracts new potential consumers with every passing day, factoring in how it’s derived from the cannabis plant leads to reasonable questioning of its legality. 

3 minute read

Does CBD show up on a drug test? September 27, 2019

As search data reveals, more and more people are not only intrigued by CBD but are taking a step further to learn more about it. In August 2019, online searches on CBD continued to display a spiked interest, with search trends showcasing how researching CBD has even surpassed the likes of celebrities from Beyoncé to Kim Kardashian, along with clean eating hot topics like kale and veganism.These are merely a few examples of popular searches that have now slipped under the radar due to the growing interest in CBD. As CBD attracts new potential consumers with every passing day, factoring in how it’s derived from the cannabis plant leads to reasonable questioning of its legality.

CBD, also known as cannabidiol, is a naturally occurring compound found in the cannabis plant. However, THC is also found in the cannabis plant and due to its intoxicating effects, has prompted the United States government to regulate it accordingly. By the 1930s, cannabis was regulated as a drug in every state. The Controlled Substances Act of 1970 deemed cannabis a Schedule 1 substance, listing the plant as illegal under federal law. As the late 1970s and early 1980s approached, numerous states passed legislation that addressed the medical usage and potential benefits of cannabis, despite medical cannabis being prohibited at the federal level. Soon after, waves of decriminalization and legislative reform swept throughout the country, with such efforts continuing today.

Currently, the medical use of cannabis is legalized in 33 states with a doctor's recommendation. The recreational use of cannabis is currently legal in 11 states. Because the law is changing at a rapid pace, it is imperative that you understand where the legislation stands in the state in which you are participating in cannabis use. This will directly influence whether or not CBD derived from cannabis plants high in THC will be legal to consume, as well as plays a role in determining if the CBD you're using will show up on a drug test.

Currently, the medical use of cannabis is legalized in 33 states with a doctor's recommendation. The recreational use of cannabis is currently legal in 11 states.

There are several factors to consider. First and foremost, CBD itself shouldn't show up on a drug test, as CBD is not a chemical compound standard drug tests are specifically looking for. However, many CBD products contain trace amounts of THC, which will show up on a drug test. If you consume CBD that has enough THC content, this could flag on the results of a drug test. Through the 2018 Farm Bill, hemp lost its status as a Schedule 1 drug and instead was deemed an agricultural commodity. In other words, CBD products derived from plants with less than 0.3% THC are legally available commercially, so long as they comply with specific regulations in place.

Essentially, purchasing and consuming hemp-derived CBD is completely legal, and therefore will not interfere with drug testing. However, if the product has a trace of THC in it, this could appear on a drug test and implicate the user. Traditionally, drug tests are specifically looking for THC, or one of its main metabolites, THC-COOH. However, with this in mind, there is still somewhat of a grey area to be mindful of. According to a 2018 report from Mayo Clinic Proceedings, federal workplace drug testing was designed to have cutoff levels, which were established to help minimize false-positive results. In other words, results that find amounts that are less than the established cutoff value would be marked negative. This doesn't necessarily mean that a negative result reveals that no substance is present in the body; rather, there isn't high enough of a concentration present to deem it positive. Urine testing for cannabis is especially common, and for those who are subjected to taking one, THC-COOH must be present at a concentration of 50 nanograms per millimeter in order to yield a positive test result. A nanogram, for context, is approximately one-billionth of a gram.

This doesn't necessarily mean that a negative result reveals that no substance is present in the body; rather, there isn't high enough of a concentration present to deem it positive.

Drug testing, which can also be conducted through hair, blood or saliva, have different factors when it comes to cut-off levels. While hemp-derived CBD is much less likely to contain THC than marijuana-derived CBD, especially if it is made with CBD isolate, it is important to be mindful of the ingredients found in the products you're using, as well as the quantity. If a drug test is a concern, it is best to try to avoid consuming CBD products that could have traces of THC in it, as well as make sure you're purchasing CBD from a trustworthy company.


References

https://trends.google.com/trends/explore?geo=US&q=cbd,beyonce

https://nyoobserver.files.wordpress.com/2019/08/cbd-vs-beyonce-interest.jpg?quality=80&w=1270

https://medicalmarijuana.procon.org/view.resource.php?resourceID=000881

https://hempsupporter.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/What-Does-the-Farm-Bill-Do-2.pdf

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5330962/

https://www.healthline.com/health/does-cbd-show-up-on-a-drug-test#final-word-on-drug-tests

http://www.ncsl.org/research/health/state-medical-marijuana-laws.aspx

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Does CBD show up on a drug test?
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Does CBD show up on a drug test?
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